Corpcentre's Blog

May 9, 2010

How to Master Canadian Taxes Before Next Year

If you compiled a list of Canada’s greatest complexities, chances are very good that the Canadian Income Tax Act would command a respectable spot on that list. In recent years, it has expanded incredibly, becoming a quagmire of confusion to the average citizen. It is no wonder that more than half of all Canadians now secure professional help to prepare and file their tax returns.

Have you tried to hold a conversation with a tax preparer during tax season? It is limited to several words as most tax professionals literally work around the clock to prepare as many returns as possible. If you are one of the clients, appreciate that your expectations are linked directly to your level of cooperation. In other words, your accountant cannot use information, sometimes basic and crucial, if you don’t supply it. Due to the tremendous workload and seasonal pressure, the accountant may not ask every question. Therefore, be prepared to supply certain information, along with your receipts and T4’s or T5’s.

The amount of tax you pay depends on a number of key facts that your accountant should know. Marital status and exact age are crucial as these affect possible tax credits or deductions. Your children, depending on their ages, create numerous tax credits and deductible expenses. Accuracy is essential; there is no room for approximation.

If you were employed at several jobs, be sure that each employer is listed in your return, even if you did not receive a T4. You are responsible for paying taxes on earned income and your accountant must be aware of every dollar that you earned.

If you own a business, compile a detailed list of every possible expense and revenue. Your accountant can decide which are not relevant, if any. Don’t make assumptions by yourself; let the professional decide.

List all your financial holdings, including any overseas investments. With all the pertinent information available, your accountant can determine your tax liabilities. Similarly, don’t forget to list “non-employment” income such as rental income, capital gains from sale of property, etc.

Finally, don’t forget medical expenses. Keep all your receipts for treatments, medications, insurance, etc. You paid dearly for your health and some of the expenses may return to you.

Spend some time researching tax credits and benefits. If you’re not sure whether you are eligible, ask your accountant. It is better to err on the side of caution. It’s easier to remove some numbers but much harder to add them if they were never included.

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April 25, 2010

Canadian Tax Deductions to Keep in Mind

Get ready, Canada – April 30th is rapidly approaching. As most Canadians are aware, this auspicious date heralds the end of the tax season for the previous year. It is your last opportunity to make any adjustments to your taxable income and, hopefully, reduce the tax due.

Tax deductions exist within the legal system to allow a degree of parity amongst taxpayers and create a balance between earned income and the relevant taxes. However, as most accountants will point out, although the government will allow you legal deductions on your tax return, they will not contact you to point out possible deductions that you missed claiming. Therefore, research and consulting may be worth money in your pocket.

Here are a few sample deductions you may have missed:

Certain adult family members living at home can reduce your taxable income. If you have a relative over 18 with a physical or mental disability, and they live with you, you can deduct more than $4,000 of your taxable income for the expenses incurred for them.

Do you work from home in your rented apartment? If you have dedicated workspace at home, and work there at least 50% of your time, a portion of your rent and maintenance expenses may qualify as a tax deduction

If you are required to use your own car for business purposes, and do not receive a nontaxable allowance from your employer, you can deduct a portion of your auto expenses including lease payment, loan interest, maintenance, licence and repairs.

Who ever thought that your hobby may be tax deductible? If you earn some side income from your hobby and travel in order to do so, a portion of the travel expenses can be claimed against your taxable income.

A person who drives for a living can claim a portion of their food expenses while traveling. Similarly, when you travel for work, it is expected that you need lodging and showers. These, too, are deductible expenses.

If you are filing a simple return, it may not be necessary for you to incur the expense of a professional tax preparer. The Canada Revenue Agency maintains a highly informative website. On the other hand, if you feel you may be missing something, consult with a professional. After all, as honest hardworking Canadians, we all pay our taxes. But, we wouldn’t mind paying just a little less.

Incorporate in Canada with CorporationCentre.ca
Click. You’re incorporated ®

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